How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by stimmingexperiments » Mon Oct 19, 2020 5:58 am

What sort of gauge qualifies as "thick" copper wire? Would using multiple pieces of 1mm wire be safe?

The loops are only a few months old. So unless they degrade in warehouses they should still be conductive. If I wanted to buy say a metre to cut my own what terms should I search for?



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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by joannesReviews » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:38 am

Stretching degrades the conductive rubber by breaking down the bonds between the conductive carbon elements resulting in higher resistance. I use 1.5mm copper wire as that is a nice snug fit in the conductive rubber that takes TENS style pins (usually with an internal diameter of 1.75mm.

Just search for 1.5mm solid copper wire. You can use multistrand wire but it is a pain in the butt to thread through the CR and it doesn't give you the ability to bend and form the CR into shapes. But on the other hand, it is ideal if you want to minimise the stiffness of your modified CR. If using multistrand wire apply some solder to each end to stop it fraying.
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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by Stimaddict » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:57 am

stimmingexperiments wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 5:58 am
What sort of gauge qualifies as "thick" copper wire? Would using multiple pieces of 1mm wire be safe?
I use the single strand copper wire from a piece of mains cable, the type used for wiring household sockets. You'll find it at your local DIY store.
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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by mrbutt89 » Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:04 am

stimmingexperiments wrote:
Fri Oct 16, 2020 5:23 pm
Another thing I was thinking was to use something to pinch the loop together before it enters the clip.
Interestingly, my original set of CR loops from E-Stim Systems used a very small diameter strong rubber band to complete the loop, but in later sets it was replaced with the spring clip they now use. I always felt the rubber band was better for me, as it kept the gap in the CR minimal and resulted in fewer painful pinches when adjusting the length of the CR. I'm sure E-SS had good reasons for moving away from the rubber band arrangement, but I'd be interested to know exactly why they did.

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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by MickEstim » Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:48 am

stimmingexperiments wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 5:58 am
The loops are only a few months old. So unless they degrade in warehouses they should still be conductive. If I wanted to buy say a metre to cut my own what terms should I search for?
It is unlikely that they would have degraded in our warehouse, but depending on the lube you are using this might have caused an issue. Anything with oil or silicone in will cause them to degrade. Personally I do not think that is the issue, and I feel it may be more to do with your skin perhaps as I have never suffered from this sort of issue in all the years that I have used conductive rubber loops, but I am aware that some do and generally it is to do with more sensitive skin, but I am sorry that you are having this problem.
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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by MickEstim » Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:52 am

mrbutt89 wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:04 am
Interestingly, my original set of CR loops from E-Stim Systems used a very small diameter strong rubber band to complete the loop, but in later sets it was replaced with the spring clip they now use. I always felt the rubber band was better for me, as it kept the gap in the CR minimal and resulted in fewer painful pinches when adjusting the length of the CR. I'm sure E-SS had good reasons for moving away from the rubber band arrangement, but I'd be interested to know exactly why they did.
The answer is pretty simple really, we stopped using the small loop as customers complained that they kept breaking them and that it was fiddly to adjust the adjust the loops so we changed it to the toggle that we currently use and which is used by other companies.
Hope that answers your question.
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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by mrbutt89 » Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:55 am

MickEstim wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:52 am
The answer is pretty simple really, we stopped using the small loop as customers complained that they kept breaking them and that it was fiddly to adjust the adjust the loops so we changed it to the toggle that we currently use and which is used by other companies.
Hope that answers your question.
Thanks, Mick, that all makes sense. I must have been in the minority, as I preferred the rubber band arrangement. I myself never broke one, and I actually liked the fact they allowed the loop to grow with me, thus preventing it from getting too tight. But, of course, you have to go with the preference of a majority of customers, and there's nothing to stop people like me sourcing our own rubber bands - much easier than tracking down the plastic clips.

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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by TJgimp » Tue Oct 20, 2020 9:28 pm

Interesting that a burn is even possible. Lack of conductivity is is the simplistic answer. Just add gel?

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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by Korsakovski » Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:25 pm

joannesReviews wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:38 am
Stretching degrades the conductive rubber by breaking down the bonds between the conductive carbon elements resulting in higher resistance. I use 1.5mm copper wire as that is a nice snug fit in the conductive rubber that takes TENS style pins (usually with an internal diameter of 1.75mm.

Just search for 1.5mm solid copper wire. You can use multistrand wire but it is a pain in the butt to thread through the CR and it doesn't give you the ability to bend and form the CR into shapes. But on the other hand, it is ideal if you want to minimise the stiffness of your modified CR. If using multistrand wire apply some solder to each end to stop it fraying.
Joanne, please elaborate on how to go about inserting the copper wire. I imagine with CR enough space should be left te enable insertion of the TENS style pins. Thnx!

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Re: How to avoid burns at the gap in conductive loops?

Post by joannesReviews » Mon Nov 23, 2020 10:44 am

Hi, just remove your conductive rubber from its clamp or anything it is thread through so that it can be laid flat.

Measure it and then subtract the length the TENS style plug that you have. Then straighten out the wire and insert it into one end of the conductive rubber. I find that holding the wire about an inch from the CR and then twisting and pushing the conductive rubber over the wire works best. Once you have moved it to the fingers holding the wire, move your hand another inch and repeat, you will soon have all of the wire inserted.

If you plan on using flexible wire rather than solid core wire one option is to thread a thin piece of solid wire through the conductive rubber first. Then solder that to your flexible wire and use the solid wire to pull the flexible wire through.

If you plan on using a loop for tri-phase then when you measure it just subtract the length of two plugs from the length of the solid core wire so you can fit it in place with enough room at each end for a plug to be inserted.
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